Part of the process

Montage image showing Kate Beaugié's website displayed on a laptop screen against a dark back drop of a photogram with leaves on water

Last Summer, Kate approached me to build her a website. She openly admitted to her struggles with technology, particularly apps that forced her to go against her natural creative thought process, a cyclical, organic pattern that makes her artwork unique. She loved exploring the natural interactions of light and dark and could confidently share her talents with the world. However, she wasn’t confident about presenting her work online more professionally to capture the attention of gallerists and generate more sales.

Of course, I wasn’t handed all of this information on a plate in our initial conversation. Once I was confident that we could work together to build her website, we had an in-depth one-to-one video interview where I asked her a series of open questions to assess her needs. There were no wrong or right answers to questions such as, ‘How does making art make you feel?’ or ‘What would an ideal day as an artist look like for you?’ but each response gave me insight into her personality, her likes and dislikes, and ultimately, her goals.

By the end of the interview, I had many notes, which I grouped into common themes. These notes formed the basis of my strategic plan to build her website, which I presented to her as a takeaway PDF document. The plan described her current situation, her desired outcomes, and the steps I would take to get her there.

Extract of the ClickUp project task list view showing a list of tasks to be completed in sequential order
Extract of the ClickUp project task list view.
Interview notes grouped on Miro board
Interview notes grouped on Miro board.
Extract from the ABC PreFlight Web Strategy Plan document
Extract from the ABC PreFlight Web Strategy Plan document.
Site Map diagram on Miro board
Site Map diagram on Miro board.

Many clients perceive that once they go ahead with a project, I wave a magic wand and ‘Hey presto!’, a website appears. AI might be heading us in that direction, but we’re not quite there yet. A series of small steps are still required to make it to more significant steps and, subsequently, the final unique product.

Once Kate approved the plan, I created a project schedule in ClickUp, my go-to platform for organising my daily tasks. Using the interview notes and the strategic plan as a guide, I presented Kate with a series of key deliverables:

  • The mood board, which showed examples of websites we both liked, samples of her artworks along with proposed typography and colour palettes, inspired the overarching style of the website
  • The wireframe hand sketches and Figma mockups quickly gave Kate an impression of the skeletal layout and structure of the website
  • The high-fidelity mockups fleshed out the established structure and gave Kate an idea of how the logo, fonts, image and colour palette would come together in context
  • The approved designs established the style guide for the WordPress build using Oxygen Builder.
Moodboard presentation showing a collection of design patterns, fonts, typography, photos and colour palette
Moodboard presentation extract.
Hand sketch extract from Miro board showing rough website layout wireframes drawn on brown paper with black ink
Hand sketch extract from Miro board.

Figma wireframe prototypes with basic interaction.

It was a collaborative process. Kate would give me her feedback after each deliverable was received, and I would iterate the next stage until final approval. Sometimes, all that was needed was a written conversation in the ClickUp task chat. Sometimes, it was a 30-minute video to discuss the best way forward. Eventually, we reached the stage where I could present Kate with a fully working website.

Extract of the Figma colour palette board showing the core colours in various tints and shades
Extract of the Figma colour palette board.
Extract of the Figma typographic style board showing the core settings for headings and body text
Extract of the Figma typographic style board.

Figma high-fidelity prototypes with basic interaction.

Extract from the Oxygen Builder GUI showing the established global colour settings
Extract from the Oxygen Builder GUI showing the established global colour settings

Kate had quite an emotional response and was taken aback by how well I had captured the ethos of her work in the design. By restricting access to the Oxygen design templates but allowing her to edit text and images and create new posts independently through the WordPress editor, I gave her something she could continue to mould over time.

Kate Beaugié website home page displayed on MacBook Air

Since the official website launch, Kate has received lots of praise for her new website, especially from the gallery with which she is currently partnered. I hope that it will also lead to her getting more sales of her fantastic art.

With each new web design project, I strive to improve and streamline this design process. If you need a brand-new WordPress website or want to refresh an existing design from the ground up, I can help. Visit my website for more information, and get in touch to see if we can collaborate.

Portrait photo of Kate Beaugié smiling
“Working with Anthony was a complete pleasure and a very stress-free journey. He understood the aesthetic of my work to such a level that his presentation of my artwork looks completely right and natural within the framework of the site. I am thrilled with the website and I believe it is helping my career as a professional artist. I can't recommend working with Anthony enough!”
Kate Beaugié
Light Artist